Posts for tag: warts

By Skin MD
November 14, 2018
Category: Skin Care
Tags: warts  

Treatment of wartsFind out the most effective ways to remove a wart.

The common wart is a small tumor caused by a virus known as the human papillomavirus (HPV). Warts can occur anywhere on the body. They may come and go over the years. The HPV infection can produce everything from the common, noncancerous wart, to cancerous warts of the mouth or genitals.

Since a virus causes warts, these benign growths are also contagious. Sharing towels and clothing, or even just coming in contact with their wart can cause the virus to spread. The good news is that most warts often go away on their own without treatment; however, it can often take months or even years for them to go away. If the wart is unsightly or in an uncomfortable spot then you may want to have it removed. Here are some of the top ways to effectively remove a wart yourself.

Salicylic Acid Treatment

Salicylic acid treatment can come in several forms including pads or gels. They can be used to get rid of a variety of different kinds of warts from the small ones to the large, lumpier ones. Salicylic acid works by breaking down the protein that makes up the layers of the wart.

At ­Home Freezing

While your dermatologist is able to remove warts with liquid nitrogen, if you’re looking to remove the wart yourself, then you can also opt for aerosol wart removals that can be sprayed on the wart to freeze it. While the over­the­counter products are nearly as effective as the freezing methods your dermatologist can use, many patients still find at­home freezing to be just as effective.

If none of these at­home treatments remove your wart, then it’s time to talk to your dermatologist about other treatment options. Keep in mind that even the most effective wart treatment can’t guarantee that the wart won’t grow back. This is because most of the treatments available only get rid of the wart but not the actual virus.

If you’re dealing with a painful or unsightly wart but over­the­counter treatments aren’t working, then it’s time to call our dermatology office today.

By Skin MD
August 20, 2018
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Moles   Birthmarks   warts  

Doctor inspecting a mole

Whether you have a mole, birthmark or warts, it is important to pay close attention to any skin abnormality to ensure they do not develop into a more serious condition. Regular self-exams and trips to your dermatologist are important in preventing further complications. While moles and birthmarks are normal and common, and warts are typically unpleasant but not serious, any of these conditions could develop into a more serious issue if you aren't paying attention.

Moles

Moles are common - almost everyone has a few and some people develop hundreds. Individuals with light skin tend to have more moles, with the average ranging from 10 to 40. 

Some moles can increase the risk of developing skin cancer more than others. Performing regular self-exams helps you recognize the early warning signs of melanoma. When examining your moles, look for the ABCDEs of melanoma detection:

  • Asymmetry – one half is not like the other

  • Border – irregular, scalloped or poorly defined border

  • Color – varied from one area to another, shades of tan, brown and black

  • Diameter – melanomas are usually greater than 6mm

  • Evolving – a mole or skin lesion that looks different from the rest or is changing in size, shape or color.

Warts

Warts are non-cancerous skin growths caused by a viral infection in the top layer of the skin. Viruses that cause warts are called human papillomavirus (HPV). Usually skin-colored and rough to the touch, warts can also be dark, flat and smooth. The appearance of a wart depends specifically on where it is growing. There are several kinds of warts, including:

  • Common warts – Usually grow on fingers, around the nails and on the backs of the hands.

  • Plantar Warts – Typically found on the soles of the feet.

  • Flat Warts – Smaller and smoother than other warts, and tend to grow in large numbers.

Usually passed from person to person, warts can also be passed indirectly in some cases. The gap from first contact to the time the warts have grown large enough to be seen is often several months.

Birthmarks

Birthmarks are areas of flat or raised discolored skin that are often on the body at birth or may develop shortly after birth. Birthmarks vary in color and may be brown, tan, black, blue, pink or red. Some birthmarks are only 'stains' on the surface of the skin, while others extend into the tissues under the skin or grow above the surface.  

If you have a mole, birthmark or wart, it is important to visit your dermatologist for regular screenings in addition to self-exams at home.  Though these are often harmless, it is important to keep a close eye on your ailments to prevent any further problems.